What NOT To Say

Humans are hard-wired to say something when silence lingers long between them.  

So it’s not surprising that when death makes talking difficult, the person most susceptible to that pressure will often blurt out the first thing that pops into her head.

And it is often, oh, so wrong.  

Any sentence that begins with , “Just remember”, “At least”  or “I know exactly” is better left unsaid.

image of what not to say

Author: Melanie

I am a shepherd, wife and mother of four amazing children, three that walk the earth with me and one who lives with Jesus. This is a record of my grief journey and a look into the life I didn't choose. If you are interested in joining a community of bereaved parents leaning on the promises of God in Christ, please like the public Facebook page, "Heartache and Hope: Life After Losing a Child" and join the conversation.

1 thought on “What NOT To Say”

  1. “I know exactly”, “I know how you feel.” – ugh. Even if someone else has gone through an experience similar to us, it is not exactly the same. And we all have different personalities and backgrounds which can make our reactions/feelings different – so someone else does NOT know exactly how we feel. Maybe in such cases, where someone has shared a similar experience, it would be best just to make a simple statement such as: “My daughter died as a child too.” or “My brother is a drug addict too.” (??)

    Liked by 1 person

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