It’s No Sin To Grieve

You’d be surprised how often Christians are shamed for grief.

Families are encouraged to call their loved one’s service a “celebration of life” instead of a “memorial” or “funeral”.

Of course I celebrate my son’s life-he was a gift-but the day I followed his casket to the cemetery didn’t feel like a celebration, it felt like death.

I continue to grieve what has been ripped violently from me.

Until all is redeemed and restored in heaven, I will walk this Valley in tears.

Grief is not sin.  

It wasn’t until another grieving mom asked the question that I realized there are some (many?) in the community of believers that think grief is sin.

Not at first, mind you-everyone is “allowed” a certain amount of time to get over the loss of a dream, the loss of a job, the loss of health or the loss of a loved one.

But carry that sadness and wounded heart too publicly for too long and you better be ready for someone to question your faith.

Read the rest here:  Grief is Not Sin

 

Author: Melanie

I am a shepherd, wife and mother of four amazing children, three that walk the earth with me and one who lives with Jesus. This is a record of my grief journey and a look into the life I didn't choose. If you are interested in joining a community of bereaved parents leaning on the promises of God in Christ, please like the public Facebook page, "Heartache and Hope: Life After Losing a Child" and join the conversation.

8 thoughts on “It’s No Sin To Grieve”

  1. No one should be so cruel especially Christians but sadly they can be. If someone says something to me about moving on or getting over it I’ll nicely ask them “tell me, which of your children could you live without”. Hopefully they’ll never be so inconsiderate to anyone else.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve thought that often but never been brave enough to say it. Usually I just say that death is awful and that I will love my son as long as I breathe. That usually hushes them up. ❤

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    1. Honestly, I think a huge part of why some-not all-believers are prone to rushing others through grief is that it represents a threat to their own faith. They are afraid that if so-and-so, who seemed to be such a “strong” Christian isn’t “over” it, then how could they ever hope to survive a tragic loss? Most of them simply haven’t experienced a trial severe enough to sorely test their faith. And they don’t realize that tested faith admits doubt and that joy and sorrow can live together. ❤

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      1. Unfortunately fear can bring out the worst in people but it’s so sad that you’ve had to deal with selfishness like that when you have so much on your plate already. You seem like an incredibly strong person and it sounds as though you’ve kept the comfort of your faith through the most difficult test of all. xx

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